A Department Store Created a Brilliant Gift Registry to Help Domestic Abuse Survivors

Slate       August 15, 2016
By Kristin Hohenadel

The Give Registry is a brilliant new gift registry and ad campaign from Australian department store chain Myer and agency Clemenger BBDO Melbourne that uses the model of a wedding gift registry to provide linens, cookware, dishes, and other household basics to domestic violence survivors.

“When a woman leaves abuse, all she often leaves with is her life,” Clemenger BBDO Melbourne said in a project description. “The Give Registry is a collection of essential items women need most when they’re starting over. You can help by contributing an item on the registry at any Myer store. All items are donated directly to Salvation Army women’s refuges, to pass on to women in need.”

To publicize the campaign, Clemenger BBDO Melbourne has made a series of simple, affecting videos of everyday objects in household settings, hauntingly narrated by women who have suffered domestic abuse. The spots reveal how seemingly banal household objects can become infused with sinister meaning when they are turned into weapons.

And they demonstrate the healing power of reappropriating objects that are so easily taken for granted to re-establish new rituals, the promise contained in a pristine pair of white sheets, or a shiny new tea kettle, or a stack of unbroken dinner plates.

The campaign began in early August and has already received 2,000 donations, including Myer customers who have abandoned their own wedding registries, asking friends and family to make donations to the Give Registry instead.

TO SEE VIDEOS IN ORIGINAL ARTICLE CLICK HERE.

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It’s Happened Again

STanford Seal2

Harriet —

It’s happened again.

University of Colorado student Austin Wilkerson sexually assaulted an intoxicated freshman after telling his friends he was going to help her home.

Wilkerson was convicted of felony sexual assault, that should have resulted in a prison sentence of 4 to 12 years. Instead, District Judge Patrick Butler sentenced him to 20 years to life on probation and 2 years of work release.

Many have made comparisons to the Stanford case. Stanford swimmer Brock Turner sexually assaulted an unconscious woman, yet Judge Persky sentenced him to only six months in county jail.

Our justice system is failing sexual assault survivors. These lenient sentences perpetuate rape culture and send the message that campus rape isn’t real rape. Donate now to help us fight back against these judges.

The horrible events at Stanford University have put a spotlight on campus rape culture and the unreasonably light sentences we see handed out to offenders. But, this issue is now front-and-center on the national stage.

Support our effort to Recall Judge Persky. It will send a clear message to judges across the country that they could be next if they fail to properly punish perpetrators.

Thank you,
Michele Dauber
Chair, Committee to Recall Judge Persky

 

=Michele Dauber is a Stanford law professor and a sociologist, Michele Landis Dauber has written highly original historical and sociological studies focusing on the history of social provision and the US welfare state. Her first book, The Sympathetic State (2013 University of Chicago Press) received numerous distinguished book awards and prizes including from the American Historical Association, the American Sociological Association, the American Political Science Association, the American Society for Legal History, and the Law and Society Association.

Rally to Recall Judge Persky re Sentencing of Brock Turner

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Harriet –

In June 2016, Judge Aaron Persky sentenced Stanford swimmer Brock Turner to six months in county jail despite being found guilty of three counts of sexual assault.

On September 2nd, Brock Turner will be released from county jail after serving just three months of his sentence. This is unacceptable.

Join us at the San Jose Superior Court to rally for the Recall of Judge Persky.

Friday, September 2nd
10:00 AM PT

San Jose Superior Court
161 N. 1st Street
San Jose, CA 95113

Speakers Include:
Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-CA 15th District)
Rep. Jerry McNerny (D-CA 9th District)
Assemblymember Nora Campos (Assembly District 27)
Congressional Candidate Ro Khanna (CA 17th District)
Assembly Candidate Vicki Veenker (CA Assembly District 24)
Former Milpitas Mayor Bob Livengood
Stephanie Pham, Association of Students for Sexual Assault Prevention, Stanford University
Sofie Karasek, Sexual Assault Survivor, UC Berkeley
Kamilah Willingham, Sexual Assault Survivor, Harvard Law School
Committee to Recall Judge Persky Chair Michele Dauber

If you are able to join us, please RSVP here – and invite your friends too! We need as many supporters as possible to show Judge Persky we mean business – we will no longer tolerate lenient sentences for sex offenders.

I look forward to seeing you there!

Thank you,
Michele Dauber
Chair, Committee to Recall Judge Persky

Michele Dauber is a Stanford law professor and a sociologist, Michele Landis Dauber has written highly original historical and sociological studies focusing on the history of social provision and the US welfare state. Her first book, The Sympathetic State (2013 University of Chicago Press) received numerous distinguished book awards and prizes including from the American Historical Association, the American Sociological Association, the American Political Science Association, the American Society for Legal History, and the Law and Society Association.

Halting the blow of domestic violence in India

Few of India’s abused women seek help. Social workers in Mumbai are trying to change that – one hospital at a time.

Aljazeera          August 4, 2016
By Shruti Ravindran

Mumbai, India – It is mid-morning at the women and children’s block of the KB Bhabha Hospital, one of Mumbai’s busiest public hospitals. The hubbub is punctuated by the cries of a baby, and the contented whirring of pigeons settling to roost. A short distance from the row of open consultation cubicles with thickets of women waiting before them is a closed door marked “101”.

Inside, a group of women read from files, exchanging tales of unremitting male cruelty: men who bang women’s heads against walls. Men who force women to sleep with them, slowly empty out their bank accounts, and then force them to sleep with them again. Men who force women to have unprotected sex with them at night, and force emergency contraceptives down their throats in the morning. Men who rain repeated blows on their wives’ swollen abdomens and end their pregnancies. Men who force their wives to watch graphic videos, and then submit them to the painful acts they depict.

Bleak as these stories are, it’s unusual that they are being heard at all.

The National Family Health Survey-III (NFHS-III), published in 2005, found that while 37.2 percent of women who had ever been married had faced spousal abuse, only 2 percent sought help from the police. According to the same survey, about half of these women ended up in hospital at some point owing to the violence they experienced.

Over the past few years, social workers and healthcare workers in Mumbai’s public hospitals have used this as an opportunity to identify and help women in distress. Some train nurses and doctors to spot signs of abuse; others deploy neighbourhood field workers, usually housewives themselves, to encourage women to seek help at crisis centres like that at KB Bhabha Hospital. Unlike the default option – going to the police and setting off an irreversible, uncontrollable process – this approach ensures that women get the support they need, without the official scrutiny. Giving women agency and privacy, social workers say, could help to arrest the cycle of violence early on, and prevent tragedy.

To read more click HERE

Shruti Ravindran is a journalist based in Mumbai. She writes about science, health, development and social justice.